After weeks of working on this pattern, it’s finally ready to share with everyone! There are a few things you should know about this pattern before trying it out:

  1. This pattern is not for beginners. We’ll be working a stranded colorwork design that requires you to not only pay attention to the pattern and the chart, but also to the tension on your cast on and return pass.
  2. You will need a fabric liner. Again, stranded colorwork is to blame here. Unlike in knitting where you can float your yarn and not have long threads of yarn hanging out on the back side of your work, Tunisian Crochet stranded colorwork leaves all the threads out for the world (and your fingers) to get caught on.
  3. This project is a labor of love. By this, I mean that it will take you forever to crochet. It’s not a quick throw you can just whip up over the weekend. This baby blanket took me at least three weeks to crochet, but then again, I was using doubled-up fingering yarn (so you can probably shave off some time if you use a worsted yarn).

Ok, now that I’ve scared away half of the people who wanted to crochet this blanket, let’s talk materials and notes!

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Yarn: I used Woolike Yarn, by Loops and Threads. This yarn is only available at Michaels stores in the U.S., BUT you can use any yarn you want. It can be a fingering yarn, a worsted yarn, or anything in between. So you don’t need to order what could possibly become very expensive yarn if you live outside the U.S.

If you are using Woolike, you’ll need 4 skeins: 2 in Navy, 2 in Beige.

If you are not, here are the specs on this yarn so you can find something similar. Or again, you can use whatever yarn you want.

Weight: Super Fine (1) 
Contents: 85% acrylic, 15% nylon
Skein Weight: 3.5 oz. / 100 g
Yardage: 678 yd. / 620 m


Hook: 7 mm Tunisian & 6 mm regular hook

Additional Supplies: yarn needle, scissors, and a 28 square inch piece of fabric (for the liner).

If you would like more information about the liner, I’ll be posting a video specifically about the liner in a few short days. I’ll embed it below when it is available.

Pattern and Chart:
While I would LOVE to post all my patterns for free, a gal’s gotta pay the bills. You do not need the whole pattern in order to crochet this blanket, the Argyle Chart is enough to get you started, then you can just follow the tutorial to complete the rest. This is the same chart I use for the Argyle Scarf and Hat, and will also be using it for a sweater in the near future. I’m sure I’ll also use it for several other projects because, let’s be honest, argyle is amazing!

For fiber artists looking for all the info about this blanket, I’d recommend getting the full pattern! This 14 page beauty includes: stitch descriptions, extensive notes about the materials used, resizing the pattern, calculating yarn (if you are using a different weight or are resizing) and instructions for the border and sewing on the liner. We’ll cover row-by-row instructions for all 15 rows of the pattern, and written instructions for the color-changing return pass. The full pattern also includes an argyle chart (as a separate PDF, so it’s really 15 pages of crochet love), photos, good vibes, and every page is infused with all my love and gratitude.

Average Blanket Sizes:

Looking to resize your blanket? Here are some standard blanket sizes you can use:

InchesCentimeters
Baby36 x 3691 x 91
Toddler40 x 60102 x 152
Throw50 x 60127 x 152

For larger blankets, such as those for Twin to King beds, I suggest measuring your current comforter or well-fitting blanket. There are loads of sizes available online, but I’ve found those never really fit my bed the way I want, and measuring has yielded better results.

Written by

Atenas

Wife, mom, and maker of things :)