As mentioned in the tutorial, I am not making a pattern for these socks available (as it is essentially the same pattern as my last two sock patterns). The purpose of today’s tutorial was to teach you how to take and use your own measurements to make socks so you can not only make them in any size, but also using any yarn/hook combo of your choice.

Below are the notes for the tutorial:

To find the tutorial for this pattern, type this into the search bar on YouTube: Any Size Socks, Mode Bespoke

Yarn and hook: As this is a measurement-based pattern, you can use any yarn and hook size combo you want. To select the proper hook size for my yarn, I generally start by making a swatch using the recommended hook size on the yarn label. 

The swatch needs to be crocheted using a Tunisian Knit Stitch and an extended return pass. A standard

4 x 4 in (10 x 10 cm) swatch will do. 

If you do not like the look of the fabric, try using different hook sizes until you create your desired fabric feel/drape. 

Anatomy of a Sock:

Throughout the tutorial, I mentioned various parts of the sock which I was able to show you as we worked, but here’s a photo that will hopefully make it easier to see it all in one place.

Measurements: 

You will need to take 3 different measurements:

  1. Foot Circumference: The widest part of your foot (this is the part just below your toes). 
  2. Toe to Foot: Measure from where your toes end to where you leg begins (it’s usually around 3-4 in, or 5-10 cm).
  3. Leg Height: Measure from the top of your heel to your leg (where you want the cuff to be). 

Construction: You will crochet the body of the sock first, followed by the cuff, toes, then heel. 

The initial chain needs to measure the foot circumference measurement and needs to be crocheted in even numbers. 

The body of the sock (the sole and inseam) are worked as a series of rows in the round. The fabric will need to measure your Toe to Foot measurement. 

The gusset is crocheted as a series of increase rows to widen the fabric at the widest part of the sock, followed by a series of decrease rows that lead to the leg of the sock. The gusset increase rows are as follows based on sick size:

    Infant socks (newborn to about 3 yrs old) = 3 rows

    Child (4 yrs old to about 10 yrs) = 4 rows

    Teen/Adult (11 yrs +) = 5 rows. 

The leg of the sock is crocheted as a series of rows in the round until this section measures the Leg Height measurement.

Advice: Keep track of your stitch and row counts! If you plan to crochet two matching socks, or even multiple pairs using the same yarn/hook combo, then save yourself a headache and jot down your measurements and stitch/row counts. 

Other than that, have fun! It’s insanely rewarding to finish a pair of socks, so I wish you all that awesome feeling of accomplishment and badass-ness that comes when you finally weave in that last tail end. 

To support the channel and my work, consider you can buy a pattern or head over to Buy Me a Coffee and donate. 

Disclosures & Copyright

The photos and content on this pattern belong to Mode Bespoke, unless otherwise stated. All rights reserved.

If you are selling your work from my patterns, please credit Mode Bespoke for the pattern and provide a link to this pattern on your work. You may not use my written work, photos, or any other content posted on my blog, YouTube, Instagram, or other sites as your own or display them for public use. Please do not distribute purchased patterns, they are intended for personal use.

I work very hard to create, edit, and share my patterns. I ask you to please be respectful of my work.

Written by

Atenas Ruiz-Ramos

Crochet addict, bibliophile, and cooking enthusiast. If I'm not sleeping, I'm probably making something while reading (because why do one thing at a time, when you can do two?)

Drawing, painting, and coloring are some of my favorite things to do, so I own a ridiculous amount of art supplies & coloring books. I also enjoy making soap, and even owned a soap shop in Albuquerque for a few years.

Other than that, I've owned a few businesses and have moved cross-country a few times. I play the flute and piccolo, and love to study languages in my free time. I'm fluent in English, Spanish and French, and I speak a little German, Italian, Mandarin, Japanese, Russian, and Korean. I'm a writer, though you wouldn't know it by the quality of my bio, but I write fiction and fantasy stories. My first novel will be completed soon, and I have a second one in the works.

Someday, I will travel the world with the person I love. We will see and experience all the magic the world has to offer together, and it will be amazing.